David’s Live Fish Foods

Raising Daphnia outside

Requirements - 15 gallon or larger containers. Window screening for a cover bungee cord to hold the window screening on the tub fresh aquarium type water yeast, spirulina powder, pea powder for food daphnia starter culture Raising daphnia outdoors can really be a lot of fun. I use a couple of the big round plastic containers you can buy at the big box stores. I use the ones that have the nylon rope type handles on the sides. They cost less than $10 and hold 15 to 25 gallons of water. These really work well for raising daphnia. Other people will use the plastic swimming pools or animal watering troughs. All of these work very well. You want to fill them with water. Try and place these tubs in an area that gets as much sunlight as possible. That will help grow some algae. Even though the death they will eat it as fast as it starts any algae that you can get going is free food. Adding an airline would probably be good but I do not. Where I keep my tubs is too far away for an airline. Works just fine with out one. Once I have the container filled with good water I usually put in a handful of compost and let it sink down. This adds a lot of vital nutrients and some hardness and buffering agents to the water. The water here in Atlanta is extremely soft and acidic and Daphnia really would like a harder water. So this little compost start works well. You can also add some calcium. What I do is put in a handful of the chicken grit oyster shells. That's calcium and magnesium mixture. It will dissolve slowly keeping the pH water up for the Daphnia. At this stage is time to introduce your start a culture of Daphnia to the container and let them start to grow. If you do not have a lot of algae already growing in the tub you will need to feed the daphnia. A little active dry yeast works well with them as does spiraling a powder or some green pea powder. People feed them all kinds of things but those are the three elements that I have found to be useful for raising daphnia. Here in Atlanta in the summer time everyone always has a lot of concern about West Nile virus. That means anything that will hold water that mosquitoes can get into can get you into trouble. I take some of the nylon screening that you use in screen doors. You can but a roll of this at the box stores. I cut that the fit over my containers and then I use a gigantic bungee cord to tie it down. Mmake sure your water level is low enough that the screening does not touch the water. Otherwise the mosquitoes will still lay their eggs. I know mosquito larva is wonderful but in the South and the West Nile virus areas you just don't want mosquitoes. Another problem that we have here in Georgia is the little tree frogs or green frogs. These frogs will crawl up the sides an lay their eggs in the water. Once the frogs have moved in that will be the end of the Daphnia. The frogs either eat the daphnia or they pollute the water so bad that the daphnia will crash. She I try to keep the frogs out also. That's the reason for using the tight bungee cord wrapped around your container with the window screening. This will prevent those little tree frogs toads from getting into the water and laying their eggs. My fish don't eat tadpoles. Once you get your daphnia culture going strong it's very easy to harvest from it. Just use your basic aquarium that to scoop through the water and collect all the daphnia. Dump the collected daphnia into a smaller container with freshwater and you're ready to go feed your fish. I use a turkey baster squirted into the tanks. What makes daphnia so great is that you don't have to be careful. With how much you feed. The daphnia will live just fine in the tank until your fish eat them. That makes him a wonderful food to feed when you're going on vacation. With a good supply of daphnia inside your fish won't even know you're gone. Remember to continue to harvest, keep your daphnia fed and covered to keep the frogs and the mosquitoes out. Do this and your container will provide you Daphnia right up until it freezes. Before it freezes you want to collect some of it to bring indoors. See my other page or raising daphnia indoors and my other videos on raising Daphnia indoors. Below is a Youtube video showing all of this in action. Please subscribe to my channel and stay up to date on all my latest videos. There are several more videos about earthworms on my channel. Enjoy!
David’s Live Fish Foods

Raising Daphnia outside

Requirements - 15 gallon or larger containers. Window screening for a cover bungee cord to hold the window screening on the tub fresh aquarium type water yeast, spirulina powder, pea powder for food daphnia starter culture Raising daphnia outdoors can really be a lot of fun. I use a couple of the big round plastic containers you can buy at the big box stores. I use the ones that have the nylon rope type handles on the sides. They cost less than $10 and hold 15 to 25 gallons of water. These really work well for raising daphnia. Other people will use the plastic swimming pools or animal watering troughs. All of these work very well. You want to fill them with water. Try and place these tubs in an area that gets as much sunlight as possible. That will help grow some algae. Even though the death they will eat it as fast as it starts any algae that you can get going is free food. Adding an airline would probably be good but I do not. Where I keep my tubs is too far away for an airline. Works just fine with out one. Once I have the container filled with good water I usually put in a handful of compost and let it sink down. This adds a lot of vital nutrients and some hardness and buffering agents to the water. The water here in Atlanta is extremely soft and acidic and Daphnia really would like a harder water. So this little compost start works well. You can also add some calcium. What I do is put in a handful of the chicken grit oyster shells. That's calcium and magnesium mixture. It will dissolve slowly keeping the pH water up for the Daphnia. At this stage is time to introduce your start a culture of Daphnia to the container and let them start to grow. If you do not have a lot of algae already growing in the tub you will need to feed the daphnia. A little active dry yeast works well with them as does spiraling a powder or some green pea powder. People feed them all kinds of things but those are the three elements that I have found to be useful for raising daphnia. Here in Atlanta in the summer time everyone always has a lot of concern about West Nile virus. That means anything that will hold water that mosquitoes can get into can get you into trouble. I take some of the nylon screening that you use in screen doors. You can but a roll of this at the box stores. I cut that the fit over my containers and then I use a gigantic bungee cord to tie it down. Mmake sure your water level is low enough that the screening does not touch the water. Otherwise the mosquitoes will still lay their eggs. I know mosquito larva is wonderful but in the South and the West Nile virus areas you just don't want mosquitoes. Another problem that we have here in Georgia is the little tree frogs or green frogs. These frogs will crawl up the sides an lay their eggs in the water. Once the frogs have moved in that will be the end of the Daphnia. The frogs either eat the daphnia or they pollute the water so bad that the daphnia will crash. She I try to keep the frogs out also. That's the reason for using the tight bungee cord wrapped around your container with the window screening. This will prevent those little tree frogs toads from getting into the water and laying their eggs. My fish don't eat tadpoles. Once you get your daphnia culture going strong it's very easy to harvest from it. Just use your basic aquarium that to scoop through the water and collect all the daphnia. Dump the collected daphnia into a smaller container with freshwater and you're ready to go feed your fish. I use a turkey baster squirted into the tanks. What makes daphnia so great is that you don't have to be careful. With how much you feed. The daphnia will live just fine in the tank until your fish eat them. That makes him a wonderful food to feed when you're going on vacation. With a good supply of daphnia inside your fish won't even know you're gone. Remember to continue to harvest, keep your daphnia fed and covered to keep the frogs and the mosquitoes out. Do this and your container will provide you Daphnia right up until it freezes. Before it freezes you want to collect some of it to bring indoors. See my other page or raising daphnia indoors and my other videos on raising Daphnia indoors. Below is a Youtube video showing all of this in action. Please subscribe to my channel and stay up to date on all my latest videos. There are several more videos about earthworms on my channel. Enjoy!